Convergent and Divergent Validity between ImPACT and CPT-3 in Adolescents with Mild Traumatic Brain Injury

Journal of the International Neuropsychological Society. 2018 Nov;

24(s1):152-153.

Lace, J. W., Dorflinger, J., Ross, M. J. and Gfeller, J..

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Abstract:

Objective: Research has reported construct validity for previous editions of Conners’ Continous Performance Tests (CPTs; Conners, 2000) and the Immediate Post-Concussion Assessment and Cognitive Testing (ImPACT; Iverson et al., 2005) in separate samples. To date, no work has reported convergent and divergent validity between ImPACT and Conners’ CPT, third edition (CPT-3; Conners, 2014) in a sample of adolescents with mTBIs. Participants and Methods: Archival data from a Midwestern hospital included 83 adolescents seen for neuropsychological evaluation after mTBI. Sample demographics were: Mean age = 14.86; 53% male; 60% Caucasian. Measures were five scores from ImPACT (Verbal Memory, Visual Memory, Motor Control, Reaction Time, and Impulse Control) and four from CPT-3 (Omissions, Commissions, Hit Response Time, and Hit Rate Variability). Pearson’s correlation coefficients were performed with significance level set at p < .05. Results: Mean ImPACT (e.g., Visual Memory M = 49.77) and CPT-3 (e.g., Commissions M = 50.05) scores were within normal limits, suggesting that most participants did not demonstrate overt cognitive deficits associated with their injury. Selected CPT-3 variables significantly correlated with ImPACT Impulse Control (rs ranged from .30 to .47), and Motor Control (rs ranged from -.35 to -.26). CPT-3 Hit Response Time significantly correlated with ImPACT Reaction Time (r = -.53). Nonsignificant correlation coefficients emerged between ImPACT memory composites and selected CPT-3 variables (rs ranged from -.15 to -.01). Conclusions: Significant correlations between measures of similar constructs (e.g., ImPACT RT and CPT-3 HRT) and nonsignificant correlations between those of diverse constructs (e.g., ImPACT Verbal Memory and CPT-3 HRV) supported convergent and divergent validity for ImPACT and CPT-3. Future psychometric study on computerized measures of neurocognitive functioning in individuals with mTBIs should consider using ImPACT and CPT-3.

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